YAM - Yet Another Mailer (#2) - Word matching to fight SPAM… (#80) - Message List

Word matching to fight SPAM…
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Does anyone like the idea of rollovers on the subject: of incoming email that reveal random words based on user programming? I was thinking that this would be a good way to combat spam without needing to read message in its entirity.

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  • Message #310

    Does anyone like the idea of rollovers on the subject: of incoming email that reveal random words based on user programming? I was thinking that this would be a good way to combat spam without needing to read message in its entirity.

    Sorry, but I don't get it really. What exactly do you propose, suggest? Please outline your ideas a bit more in details than just writing a single line. We really need more information to follow you.

  • Message #311

    Heh, well I suppose. I have enjoyed YAM for a while now. . .

    A rollover would be a familiar Javascript term for a mouse action that occurs once pointer surfaces over field. In monitor-speak, that means that when the mouse pointer hits a certain pre-defined area of pixels, a calculated or predetermined action happens.

    That action would be some sort of word balloon--possibly you see them with MUI or other programs that pop up balloon advisory saying what any particular button does as part of a help function. Some programs pop up messages near the button, some pop up messages in pre-defined space. The idea I had were for the word balloon to appear and summarize the message according to a virtually unlimited, simple search parameters that anyone can program--but also by a default setting that looks neat for users who don't want to go to the trouble.

    Anyway, here goes my problem: I don't want to read a message I think would be spam, so I would like an option to pluck out words that I can program. Let's say that I want to reveal all "4-letter words" in the message and all matches for "money" or "act." I can do so by typing in a search delimiter that specifies something like (#?money#? | #?act#? | ####) or if I want to count misspellings I would say (#?+(#?'>=0'#?)+#?) i.e., "check for any words that contain any number greater or equal to zero"--that will show me maybe 9 hits for Vic0nt1n or 200 hits for med1cat10n. Or any words that contain symbols: (#?+('/nonalpha')+#?). This would not be a complete compare routine that I have just given because it leaves out possible details, but the checking symbology I'm using here, though partly fubar'd, should be familiar to Amiga users familiar with AmigaDos or maybe Perl.

    I would like the checks to go into a recurrent database so I can pass a magic wand (mouse pointer) over the subject line and see only what I want to see: statistics.

    And then if I dare open the message, any match says what I have pre-programmed it to say, such as "ow!" for anything that I consider spam. Then I can read the message in my own words or do a rollover to check statistics.

    Anyway, I have tried to explain.

  • Message #312

    A rollover would be a familiar Javascript term for a mouse action that occurs once pointer surfaces over field. In monitor-speak, that means that when the mouse pointer hits a certain pre-defined area of pixels, a calculated or predetermined action happens.

    That action would be some sort of word balloon--possibly you see them with MUI or other programs that pop up balloon advisory saying what any particular button does as part of a help function. Some programs pop up messages near the button, some pop up messages in pre-defined space. The idea I had were for the word balloon to appear and summarize the message according to a virtually unlimited, simple search parameters that anyone can program--but also by a default setting that looks neat for users who don't want to go to the trouble.

    Ah, you are talking about the common 'help bubbles' feature in MUI. Fine.

    Anyway, here goes my problem: I don't want to read a message I think would be spam, so I would like an option to pluck out words that I can program. Let's say that I want to reveal all "4-letter words" in the message and all matches for "money" or "act." I can do so by typing in a search delimiter that specifies something like (#?money#? | #?act#? | ####) or if I want to count misspellings I would say (#?+(#?'>=0'#?)+#?) i.e., "check for any words that contain any number greater or equal to zero"--that will show me maybe 9 hits for Vic0nt1n or 200 hits for med1cat10n. Or any words that contain symbols: (#?+('/nonalpha')+#?). This would not be a complete compare routine that I have just given because it leaves out possible details, but the checking symbology I'm using here, though partly fubar'd, should be familiar to Amiga users familiar with AmigaDos or maybe Perl.

    I would like the checks to go into a recurrent database so I can pass a magic wand (mouse pointer) over the subject line and see only what I want to see: statistics.

    And then if I dare open the message, any match says what I have pre-programmed it to say, such as "ow!" for anything that I consider spam. Then I can read the message in my own words or do a rollover to check statistics.

    Anyway, I have tried to explain.

    Well, let me first of all state that YAM 2.5 will already come with a very handy and complete integration of a SPAM filter. We have put efforts into porting the whole SPAM engine of Thunderbird over to YAM and I really have to say that it works very good and reliable in our development builds.

    However, what you outlined above sounds to be a very specific feature that would be very hard to understand and manage for ordinary users. Even if it might proof useful for you, I can imagine that other users might be very confused especially when it comes to having to configure it properly. And if you consider that we have a very good SPAM engine now in YAM I can't really see the big benefit of such a manual word matching routine.

    So sorry, but until you have stronger arguments here I can't imagine why it would be necessary to implement what you suggest. If it is just for fighting against SPAM, I can only urge you to wait for the public YAM 2.5 version or to try one of the latest nightly builds available.

  • Message #313

    You already have a spam filter!

    Well, that would be most discouraging. I certainly haven't been actively computing in a little while so I haven't been using YAM actively in the recent past. But I thought the idea had potential.

    Really, I would be glad to make a case_argument for an idea any developer would leap on. I would use it myself but I had no plans to develop an email engine. So I thought either YAM can use it or it gets scuttled. . .

    See, the thing that gets me about spam were that I don't like having my concentration interrupted, so anything I can do to personalize or make the computer experience my own rather than psychically isometric, commutative -- were simply one less duplicity to recognize.

    I used to believe that the world were full of patterns and that there were no harm in being aware of continuity. But I got married and then eventually I realized that computers were no isolated incident. I thought - that really sucks like a vacuum! But because I had been rather intimate with my Amiga. Unlike other peecees, Amiga has a nice thick steel layer of shielding--something I do not usually see in other computers. Even the A1200 & A500 have a metal shield over the components. At up to 15mhz, it represents a significant shield. I think that Someone at Amiga had an idea that computers generate radiation, and that radiation could be minimized with heavy shielding. But I do not find the shielding adequate for gigahertz machines. . .

    ==> But why should I care in the first place? . . . ! <==

  • Message #314

    I used to believe that the world were full of patterns and that there were no harm in being aware of continuity. But I got married and then eventually I realized that computers were no isolated incident. I thought - that really sucks like a vacuum! But because I had been rather intimate with my Amiga. Unlike other peecees, Amiga has a nice thick steel layer of shielding--something I do not usually see in other computers. Even the A1200 & A500 have a metal shield over the components. At up to 15mhz, it represents a significant shield. I think that Someone at Amiga had an idea that computers generate radiation, and that radiation could be minimized with heavy shielding. But I do not find the shielding adequate for gigahertz machines. . .

    ==> But why should I care in the first place? . . . ! <==

    Sorry mate, you are are really talking a bit too weird for my taste :)

    I mean, you managed to talk about SPAM in first place. But then in some further sentences you come up with marriage, then further down you end up talking about shielding and the weird thoughts that classic Amigas were better designed because of their shielding and that this shielding was done because of radiation. Well, so what does this all have to do with the initial subject of this forum entry? I guess nothing at all....

    So please come back to a more professional discussion about what you actually want us - as the developer team - to do.

  • Message #315

    I guess I can't really be too chatty in a developer email forum and take a swipe at spam at the same time. Sorry for ruffling your bird's feathers.

    arcstrait

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